Core Data

 
25
Jun
2015
 

Core Data and Aggregate Fetches In Swift

by Matt Long

You can find other articles on the interwebs about NSExpression and NSExpressionDescription, however, I wasn’t really satisfied with the explanations I’ve seen. I decided to write a post myself after I recently had to become much more intimate with the way Core Data aggregate fetches work. I hope this will make clear what has to be done in order to harness this powerful feature of Core Data.

You’ve heard it said before and sometimes in a scolding tone, “CORE DATA IS NOT A DATABASE. IT’S AN OBJECT GRAPH!”. What normally follows is a discussion about what that means, if you’re lucky. Otherwise, you’re just on your own to go figure it out. In my mind, though, it’s not necessarily wrong to think of it as a database as they have enough things in common to make it a reasonable thing to do and at the end of the day Core Data is backed by a SQLite database. I think that if it helps you understand what is going on behind the scenes better, then go for it. You do have to remember some key differences that can bite you like the need to fetch before updating or deleting, for example. Though with recent additions–last year with iOS 8’s NSBatchUpdateRequest (link to iOS 8 API diff since it’s not currently documented) which allows you to perform a batch update similar to a SQL update query or this year with iOS 9’s NSBatchDeleteRequest (See WWDC 2015 session 220 for more info) which allows for batch deletes based on whatever predicate you give it, the lines seem to be blurring more and more. (more…)

 
29
Oct
2014
 

Protocols in Swift With Core Data

by Matt Long

Sometimes you have a set of objects you want to display in the same form–say, for example, in a table view controller. What if those objects have, by design, nothing in common and nothing to do with each other? This is a case where you can create and conform to a protocol–known in some languages as an interface–to provide a simple way to have each class type provide a display name that can be displayed in your table view controller.

Recently while using this language feature writing Swift code, I ran into a few snags and learned from the process. I figured I would document it in this screencast. It walks you all the way through from project creation, so it’s about 35 minutes.

Here’s what you will learn:

  • How to setup CoreData entities in the data model
  • How to add a run script action to build your managed object classes using mogenerator
  • How to create a protocol in Xcode 6
  • How to implement a protocol in the various managed object classes
  • How to preload your CoreData store with test objects in code
  • How to load each object type generically into a table view controller

And if you want to just cut to the chase, grab the code from github.

Protocols in Swift With Core Data from Skye Road Systems on Vimeo.

 
8
Jun
2014
 

The Core Data stack in Swift

by Marcus Zarra

swift-heroWhenever Apple releases a new version of Xcode one of the first things that I do is look at the default templates and see if there are any new or interesting things.

This year, with the release of Swift, there are some pretty radical changes. Yet the Core Data stack initialization code is still the same.

There is nothing wrong with the default template code but there isn’t really anything right about it either. It is far better than it once was but it is still overly verbose and hard to follow.

Therefore, I present my Swift Core Data stack code that I will be using as I grok this language.

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25
Feb
2014
 

Deleting Objects in Core Data

by Marcus Zarra

I very rarely speak out against another blog post. I find the resulting argument back and forth draining. However, there are exceptions and one occurred over the weekend.

Brent Simmons has been blogging about his conversion of Vesper to a Core Data application. A recent post of his titled Core Data and Deleting Objects set my teeth on edge. Brent says:

“The best advice I’ve heard about deleting managed objects is to 1) not do it, or 2) do it only at startup, before any references to those to-be-deleted objects can be made.”

I do not know who is giving Brent advice but he must be playing tricks with him or just trying to wind him up. The advice was simple; don’t delete Core Data objects or if you are going to delete them, delete them at launch.

Will that work? Sure. Is it the right answer? Not even close.

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29
May
2012
 

Importing Data Made Easy

by Saul Mora

Importing data is a problem that feels like it should have a library of work ready for you to use. Especially when it comes to importing data into Core Data where you have a description of your data to work with. What if there was such a library, or reusable framework, of importing code that basically converts raw data to Core Data entities? Well, wonder no further because in this post, I’ll be discussing a new addition to the MagicalRecord toolset, MagicalImport available now on Github!

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15
May
2012
 

Unit Testing with Core Data

by Saul Mora

Whether you subscribe to Test Driven Development (TDD) or another testing practice, when it comes automated unit testing with Core Data, things can be a little tricky. But if you keep it simple, and take things step by step, you can get up and running with unit testing using Core Data fairly quickly. We’ll explore the what, how and why of unit testing with Core Data. We’ll also be using the helper library MagicalRecord. MagicalRecord not only lets us get up and running faster, but helps to cut down on the noise in our tests.

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11
Jan
2012
 

Handling incoming JSON redux

by Tom Harrington

A few months ago I wrote here about a generic approach to safely take incoming JSON and save values to Core Data object. The goals of that code were twofold:

  1. Provide a safe, generic alternative to Cocoa’s -setValuesForKeysWithDictionary: for use with NSManagedObject and its subclasses
  2. Handle cases where JSON data didn’t match up with what the managed objects expected. Getting a string where you expect a numeric value, or vice versa, for example, or getting a string representation of a date when you want a real NSDate object.

The first item was the most important. It’s tempting to use -setValuesForKeysWithDictionary: to transfer JSON to a model object in one step. The method runs through the dictionary and calls -setValue:forKey: on the target object for every entry. It has a fatal flaw though, in that it doesn’t check to see if the target object actually has a key before trying to set it. Using this method when you don’t have absolute control over the dictionary contents is an invitation to unknown key exceptions and nasty app crashes.

Fixing this for managed objects was relatively easy because Core Data provides convenient Objective-C introspection methods. The general approach was:

  • Get a list of the target object’s attributes
  • For each attribute, see if the incoming dictionary has an entry. If so,
  • Compare the incoming type to the expected type, and convert if necessary.
  • Call -setValue:forKey: with that key and its value.

And then just last week I had the thought, wouldn’t it be nice if this worked for any object, not just for managed objects?

(more…)

 
14
Oct
2011
 

Parent Watching Its Child

by Marcus Zarra

Recently on [StackOverflow](http://stackoverflow.com) I have seen several questions regarding the desire for a parent Entity to be updated whenever an attribute within the child has changed.

There are several different ways to solve this problem. The easiest is to have the child ping the parent whenever it changes and then the parent can update any values it needs to as a result of that ping.
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11
Oct
2011
 

Core Data and the Undo Manager

by Marcus Zarra

*Note: This is a re-print from the Mac Developer Network.*

One of the nice things about developing software for OS X is all the “freebies” we get out of Cocoa. For example, when we are building a UI with text input we get undo support for free! How cool is that?

Likewise, when we are working with Core Data, it also has undo support built right in. Every NSManagedObjectContext has a NSUndoManager that we can use. However there are some situations where the default undo support is insufficient.

In this article we are going to walk through one such situation.
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22
Aug
2011
 

Importing and displaying large data sets in Core Data

by Marcus Zarra

*Note: This is a re-print from the Mac Developer Network.*

I tend to frequent the StackOverflow website and watch for questions about Core Data. Generally if it is a question I can answer I will and if it is a question I can’t answer then I really dig in for a fun session of exploration and attempt to find the answer.
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8
Aug
2011
 

Transient Entities and Core Data

by Saul Mora

Core Data has many features, one of which is the Transient attribute. This type of attribute on a Core Data entity is part of a data model, but is not persisted in your Core Data persistent store. If you open up the raw SQLite store file and peek at the schema, you will not find any transient attributes. These transient attributes are still handy despite no data being persisted to the data store. One useful scenario is when a value is calculated based on other attributes. This calculation can be performed in an entity’s awakeFromFetch method, and stored at run time in this transient attribute.

One scenario I’ve been asked about on more than one occasion recently is that of temporary, or transient entities. It seems that more and more developers have a need for temporary, or transient instances of entities in your Mac or iOS apps. Having temporary object instances can be useful and necessary in certain situations. Unfortunately, Transient Entities do not technically exist within the Core Data framework, however there are simple solutions to add temporary, un-persisted, data within the context of Core Data. Let’s go over some methods to effectively use the concept of Transient, or more appropriately Temporary Entities in Core Data without direct built-in support.

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2
Jun
2011
 

Saving JSON to Core Data

by Tom Harrington

Hi, I’m new here. You may know me as @atomicbird on Twitter. Just a few days ago my book Core Data for iOS: Developing Data-Driven Applications for the iPad, iPhone, and iPod touch (co-written with the excellent Tim Isted) was published, and Matt invited me to contribute some Core Data tips to CIMGF. I’m going to start off discussing taking JSON data from a web service and converting it to Core Data storage. Along the way I’ll cover how to inspect managed objects to find out what attributes they have and what the attribute types are.

Publishing lead times being what they are, this post covers information not included in the book.
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4
May
2011
 

Core Data and Threads, Without the Headache

by Saul Mora

I know I mentioned we would talk about customizing the fetch requests, however, I have been working on some code related to the Active Record Fetching project, which I am renaming to MagicalRecord, that is also just as useful as fetching–threading.

Whenever most cocoa developers mention threading and Core Data in the same sentence, the reaction I see most often is that of mysticism and disbelief. For one, multithreaded programming in general is hard–hard to design correctly, hard to write correctly, and debugging threads is just asking for trouble. Introducing Core Data into that mix can seem like the straw that broke the camel’s back. However, by following a few simple rules and guidelines, and codifying them into a super simple pattern, one that may be familiar to you, we can achieve safer Core Data threading without the common headaches.

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13
Mar
2011
 

Super Happy Easy Fetching in Core Data

by Saul Mora

First up, I want to thank Matt Long and Marcus Zarra for allowing me to guest post on CIMGF. This post is the first in a short series of topics describing how to I’ve made using Core Data a little simpler without giving up the power features you still need. The full project from which this series is derived is available on github.

Core Data, for both iPhone and Mac, is a very powerful framework for persisting your objects out of memory, and into a more permanent storage medium. With the enormous power of Core Data, it can be easy to slip into the trap of thinking that Core Data is very complex.

(more…)