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5
Jun
2010
 

Re-Ordering NSFetchedResultsController

by Matt Long

So Marcus is the Core Data guy, but I’ve been working with it a good bit myself lately and was recently faced with having to add re-ordering for a list of entities in a UITableView. The methods I found online for accomplishing this all suggested using an NSMutableArray as the data source for the table view. That will work, but I came up with another method, though similar, that achieved what I need without having to switch from using my NSFetchedResultsController as the data source behind the UITableView. In the end, I did use an NSMutableArray, however, I end up using it just to take advantage of its indexing. Read on to see what I mean.
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10
Sep
2008
 

Core Animation Tutorial: Rendering QuickTime Movies In A CAOpenGLLayer

by Matt Long

I’ve been experimenting a great deal lately with OpenGL and QuickTime trying to see how the two technologies work together. It’s been a bit challenging, but fortunately Apple provides two really great resources–number one, sample code. I’ve been able to learn a lot just from the samples they provide in the development tools examples as well as online. And second, the cocoa-dev and quicktime-api lists are great. Lot’s of brilliant people there who are willing to share their knowledge. It’s very helpful, prohibition to discuss the iPhone SDK notwithstanding.

Getting two technologies to work together can be a challenge especially when the bridges between the two are not necessarily clearly laid out in documentation. As I pointed out Apple provides some excellent sample code to help you along, but there is no hand-holding approach to any of it. I actually appreciate that having come from the Windows world as it seems that there all you get sometimes is hand-holding where Microsoft doesn’t trust you, the developer to figure things out and really own what you’re doing. But I digress (wouldn’t be a CIMGF post if I didn’t dig on MS a bit).
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27
Aug
2008
 

Cocoa Tutorial: Sync Services without Core Data

by Marcus Zarra

Sync Services have come a long way in Leopard. Before Leopard it was an extremely complex operation that was almost completely manual. Needless to say, this sucked and it was probably one of the reasons it was shunned by most developers.

If you are using Core Data in a Leopard application then Sync Services is so trivial that you should be syncing if it makes sense. In this article we are going to cover syncing in a non-Core Data situation as that is quite a bit more complex.

If you have read the Sync Services documentation then you know it is complex. Let me dispel an illusion right away. It is hard. It is not poor documentation, syncing is very hard and very few people get it right. Take a look at Omnifocus to see an example of a company thinking it is easy and losing data. Therefore if you are expecting this subject to be trivial you will be disappointed.

In this example we will be syncing with the bookmarks schema and displaying them in a simple outline view. The outline view itself will be editable and those edits can be synced back. Not terribly useful but provides a very simple example.
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18
Aug
2008
 

Cocoa Tutorial: libxml and xmlreader

by Marcus Zarra

Let us pretend for a moment that NSXMLDocument was not available to your Cocoa application for some reason. Perhaps you have low memory requirements, perhaps you are running on a slimmed down version of OS X. Whatever the reason, for the purposes of this exercise, NSXMLDocument does not exist.

Let us now assume that we have a requirement to parse an xml document quickly and without loading the entire tree into memory in a object structure. In a situation like this libxml comes in handy. Unfortunately it is quite a bit more complicated than calling alloc init on NSXMLDocument.

libxml is a C library that is included with all current releases of OS X. With this library we can quickly read in a document, scrape the information we need out of that document and avoid loading the entire tree into memory at once. In addition, libxml (and more specifically xmlReader) does this very quickly, far faster than NSXMLDocument which is very useful when you have a lower end CPU. In this project we are going to create a simple application that reads in an xml file containing a list of people, their names and their ages. For the purposes of demonstration we are going to load that data into an array of NSDictionary objects and display it in a standard Cocoa window.

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16
Jun
2008
 

Cocoa Tutorial: Custom Folder Icons

by Matt Long

This is just another one of those things that seems like it ought to be a simple little code snippet and you’re there, but in actuality it’s just not the case. I am building an exporter for my application that will export a movie project in iMovie HD format. I want to mimic the file format exactly and one of the things I noticed about the directories that are stored inside iMovie HD‘s custom format (select ‘Show Package Contents’ from the context menu in the Finder) is that they have custom icons assigned to them. So the problem to solve was how to do that programatically. Here is what I’ve found.
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3
Jun
2008
 

Version Control Makes You A Better Programmer

by Matt Long

I’m a believer. I’ve used version control before, but Marcus has convinced me that with a little known version control system called Git, written by Linus Torvalds (the creator of Linux), version control is not just about versioning, it’s about expressing yourself with your code and collaborating with others, seamlessly.

As memory serves the only time I’ve used version control in a meaningful way the system I was using was Visual SourceSafe from Microsoft. I know. Blech! It’s awful! I’ve pulled code from many a CVS or Subversion repository, but I’ve never really used them in the way they are intended to be used. Now, thanks to Marcus, I realize that version control isn’t just about versioning any more. It’s a whole methodology/ideology that makes better programmers. Here is what I mean.
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15
Apr
2008
 

Cocoa Tutorial: Get The Most Out of Key Value Coding and Observing

by Marcus Zarra

Key Value Observing/Key Value Coding (KVO/KVC) is probably one of the most powerful and most under-utilized features of Objective-C. Here are a couple of examples of how to get the most out of it

When a call is made on an object through Key Value Coding such as [self valueForKey:@"someKey"], numerous attempts are made to resolve the call. First, the method someKey is looked for. If that is not found then the iVar someKey is looked for. If neither of those are found, then one last attempt is made before presenting an error. That last attempt is a call to the method -(id)valueForUndefinedKey:. If that method is not implemented then an NSUndefinedKeyException is raised.

valueForUndefinedKey: is designed so that when you request a value from an object using -(id)valueForKey: the object has a last chance to respond to that request before an error occurs. This has many benefits and I have included two examples of those benefits in this post–Core Data Parameters and Data Formatting.

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