28
Jan
2009
 

Don’t treat your customers like thieves

by Marcus Zarra

Every once in a while I run across a situation that just amazes me. While this topic is not strictly about software development it is about the subject of the business of software.

Our customers give us money for something we have already written.

This is an important point to grasp. We write software once and sell it many times over with no production costs other than initial development. Unlike almost every other industry in the world we only have to write the software once! We do not have to produce something new every time a customer wants to purchase something from us.

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24
Jan
2009
 

Dropping NSLog in release builds

by Fraser Hess

NSLog() is a great tool that helps debugging efforts. Unfortunately it is expensive, especially on the iPhone, and depending on how it’s used or what you’re logging, it could leak sensitive or proprietary information. If you look around the web, you’ll find a few different ways to drop NSLog in your release builds. Here is what I’ve put together based on those.
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1
Dec
2008
 

MacDev 2009 Christmas Offer

by Marcus Zarra

As most of you know, Scotty is hosting a developer’s conference next year in England. To make this event even more enticing, he has just announced a Christmas offer.

Sign up for MacDev2009 before the 24th of December and get FREE copies of both Code Collector Pro and Changes App together worth over £40.

There are going to be some great speakers at this event and I am looking forward to it.

 
25
Nov
2008
 

Adding iTunes-style search to your Core Data application

by Fraser Hess

iTunes has a very neat way of searching your library, where it takes each word in your search and tries to find that word in multiple fields. For example, you can search for “yesterday beatles” and it will match “yesterday” in the Name field and “beatles” in the Artist field. The basic predicate binding for NSSearchField provided by Interface Builder is not complex enough to archive this kind of search. I need to build the predicate dynamically since I can’t assume what field the user is trying to search and that each additional word should filter the list further – just like iTunes. Here is how to go about adding iTunes-style searching.
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13
Nov
2008
 

Landscape Tab Bar Application for the iPhone

by Matt Long

As you develop applications for the iPhone, you will likely use the project templates provided in Xcode. One such template, called “Tab Bar Application” helps you get a tab bar application set up quickly, but by default the application it generates only supports portrait mode for display. So how can you make the application also support landscape or even only support landscape? In this post we will address that question.
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5
Nov
2008
 

Core Animation Tutorial: Interrupting Animation Progress

by Matt Long

Starting and stopping animations in Core Animation is as simple as adding and removing your animation from the layer upon which is being run. In this post I am going to talk about how to interrupt animation progress and how to determine whether an animation completed its full run or was interrupted. This is accomplished with the animation delegate -animationDidStop:finished.
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27
Oct
2008
 

Announcement: Marcus’ Core Data Book Just Went Beta!

by Matt Long

Core Data BookA lot of hard work has gone into this book already and I see it becoming the definitive text on the subject of Core Data. The release date is slated for March 30, 2009, but it’s great to see it in beta. If you want to pick up the beta in PDF, it is available now from Pragmatic here: Core Data: Apple’s API for Persisting Data under Mac OS X.

While new Cocoa programmers will find it a great help to getting started quickly with Core Data, the book also covers some really interesting and advanced topics such as data versioning and migration, Spotlight/Quick Look integration, Sync Services, and multi-threading. You can really see Marcus’ command of the subject shine in these chapters which are already available in the beta.

Give Marcus some feedback on the book as it progresses. It’s going to be a great reference for any Cocoa Developer looking to harness the power of Core Data.

$21.00 for the beta PDF
$41.35 for the beta PDF plus hard copy when it’s released in March.

Mad props to Marcus. Congratulations!

 
25
Oct
2008
 

Core Animation Tutorial: Slider Based Layer Rotation

by Matt Long

It is often helpful to create a custom control for you application that will display a value as a level like a gas gauge shows how full your tank is. In this post I will demonstrate how to create a three layer tree that will show the current rotation of a circular layer as the value from a slider (NSSlider) is updated in real time. The layers include the root layer, the rotation layer, and a text layer that will display the current rotation in degrees.
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4
Oct
2008
 

Announcement: Marcus will be a Panelist at O’Reilly’s iPhoneLive conference

by Marcus Zarra

Now that the NDA has been lifted we can all finally come out of the closet :)

If you have not heard, O’Reilly is hosting a conference on November 18, 2008 to discuss all things iPhone. I have been invited to attend the conference as a Panelist.

Please come and join the conference, if nothing else, to heckle me :)

iPhone Live

The list of speakers (as opposed to panelists), is quite impressive and definitely worth the trip.

Speakers

 
1
Oct
2008
 

Cocoa Touch Tutorial: iPhone Application Example

by Matt Long

Similar to one of my first blog posts on building a basic application for Mac OS X using xcode 3.0, I am going to explain for beginning iPhone/iPod Touch developers how to build the most basic Cocoa Touch application using Interface Builder and an application delegate in xcode 3.1. This tutorial post is really to provide a quick how-to. I won’t go into any depth explaining why things are done the way they are done, but this should help you get up and running with your first application pretty quickly so that you too can clog the App Store with useless superfluous apps (kidding… just kidding).

If you are a visual learner, it may be helpful to you to instead watch a video presentation of this tutorial. I’ve posted it on the site, but you’ll have to click the link to see my Cocoa Touch Video Tutorial.
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24
Sep
2008
 

Core Animation Tutorial: Core Animation And Quartz Composer (QCCompositionLayer)

by Matt Long

Last night at NSCoder night, Fraser Hess was asking question about being able to draw in a Quartz Composer View (QCView) about which none of the rest of us had any knowledge or experience. As I’ve been doing a lot with Core Animation lately, I asked him if it was possible to just make the view layer backed and start adding layers to it. Fraser hasn’t worked with Core Animation much yet, so he was unsure. The other three of us set to looking at docs and making demo apps. The race was on… Oh. It’s not a race? Sorry about that. I thought we were practicing for Iron Coder…
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10
Sep
2008
 

Core Animation Tutorial: Rendering QuickTime Movies In A CAOpenGLLayer

by Matt Long

I’ve been experimenting a great deal lately with OpenGL and QuickTime trying to see how the two technologies work together. It’s been a bit challenging, but fortunately Apple provides two really great resources–number one, sample code. I’ve been able to learn a lot just from the samples they provide in the development tools examples as well as online. And second, the cocoa-dev and quicktime-api lists are great. Lot’s of brilliant people there who are willing to share their knowledge. It’s very helpful, prohibition to discuss the iPhone SDK notwithstanding.

Getting two technologies to work together can be a challenge especially when the bridges between the two are not necessarily clearly laid out in documentation. As I pointed out Apple provides some excellent sample code to help you along, but there is no hand-holding approach to any of it. I actually appreciate that having come from the Windows world as it seems that there all you get sometimes is hand-holding where Microsoft doesn’t trust you, the developer to figure things out and really own what you’re doing. But I digress (wouldn’t be a CIMGF post if I didn’t dig on MS a bit).
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4
Sep
2008
 

Cocoa Tutorial: Creating your very own framework

by Marcus Zarra

There are numerous situations where creating your own framework is advantageous. Perhaps you have a block of code that you use repeatedly in many different projects. Perhaps you are building a plug-in system for your application and want the infrastructure to be available both to the application and to any plugins that are coded.

A Cocoa framework is another project type in Xcode. The end result is a bundle, similar to an application bundle. Inside of this bundle is the compiled code you wrote and any headers that you want exposed. The headers are important. Without them, just like any other piece of Objective-C code, it is very hard to code against.

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27
Aug
2008
 

Cocoa Tutorial: Sync Services without Core Data

by Marcus Zarra

Sync Services have come a long way in Leopard. Before Leopard it was an extremely complex operation that was almost completely manual. Needless to say, this sucked and it was probably one of the reasons it was shunned by most developers.

If you are using Core Data in a Leopard application then Sync Services is so trivial that you should be syncing if it makes sense. In this article we are going to cover syncing in a non-Core Data situation as that is quite a bit more complex.

If you have read the Sync Services documentation then you know it is complex. Let me dispel an illusion right away. It is hard. It is not poor documentation, syncing is very hard and very few people get it right. Take a look at Omnifocus to see an example of a company thinking it is easy and losing data. Therefore if you are expecting this subject to be trivial you will be disappointed.

In this example we will be syncing with the bookmarks schema and displaying them in a simple outline view. The outline view itself will be editable and those edits can be synced back. Not terribly useful but provides a very simple example.
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